Bi-corn What? (HSG Results)

Today was CD 14 and I was scheduled to have lab work to check for ovulation and a trigger shot if the follicles were ready. The ultrasound tech told me that I had one follicle that was 1.4MM and I would probably come back for my trigger on Friday. I got so excited knowing that this could be our month.

Our plan quickly changed when the doctor came in to tell me the results of my HSG test.

“Well, the good news is, your tubes aren’t blocked. The bad news is, we suspect you have either a bicornuate uterus or a uterine septum.”

A bi-corn what?! I have never heard of this until today but apparently it means you have a heart shaped uterus. Women with this condition have an increased risk of recurrent miscarriages and a higher rate of preterm delivery. The bicornuate uterus is not usually something that can be fixed.

A uterine septum means you have a “wall” splitting your uterus in two. Women with a uterine septum have an increased risk of infertility (shocker) and miscarriage. The uterine septum is removable with surgery.

I will have an MRI in a few weeks to determine which issue I have and we will go from there. Needless to say, this month’s timed intercourse cycle was cancelled (which means I took those crazy hormone meds for nothing 😭)

I know that it is not impossible to conceive with these abnormalities but pairing an abnormal uterus with PCOS can’t be a good combo. My heart is broken.

Uterine septum

Bicornuate uterus

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9 comments

  1. kissingdaylite · August 9

    Im so sorry

    Like

  2. berry · August 10

    Now that you have some answers, I hope they start turning into solutions. Good luck 💗

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  3. berry · August 10

    For sure, the diagnoses are tough to live with. With infertility and recurrent miscarriages, the stakes are so high and the process is agonizingly slow. I’m so grateful that I’m having these problems at a time when even with low odds, it’s possible medicine can help us have successful pregnancies. Can you imagine going through this even a couple decades ago? The “just relax” advice was really the height of medical technology! You had to just keep trying over and over and hoping for a different result. Of course the best case scenario is being perfectly healthy and having no problems. But given that ship having sailed, diagnoses and treatments give me more hope than “relaxing” when facing poor odds. I hope yours work!!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sammy · August 16

    Thank you for this blog, I had never heard of this. Can you still get pregnant & carry or is that not a possibility at all? I’m sorry that you’re having a difficult time & wish you luck for your continued journey. Try not to lose hope, it’s going to be a harder on your road to having a family, but it’ll be worth it. Sending you hugs. X

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  5. Pingback: MRI results – Journey Through The Storm
  6. Lauren · August 24

    I’m so sorry to hear this. I often wonder why some not nice humans have no issues while so many of us struggle so much. We got some bad news as well. We will will both continue in this emotionally challenging rollercoaster. Wish you amazing success. ❤

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  7. ~M · August 29

    I have this problem, and I ended up having 4 healthy girls. There we’re some problems along the way and I did have a couple of miscarriages. I don’t think what I experienced was very different from what most people go through though.

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  8. rainbowbright · September 12

    We really did become friends…I have a bicornuate uterus too! Mine was diagnosed alongside the endometriosis 12 years ago when I wasn’t even close to thinking about babies. The doctors at the time really played it down. They
    told me I might need a little extra help getting pregnant and I might not go full term but all totally normal and nothing to worry about. I wish I’d known then what I know now…maybe I wouldn’t have spent so many years on birth control!! Now age is a factor too. I’m going to catch up on the rest of your blog when I get time. Stay strong x

    Like

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